MOLECULAR CLOUDS


Image found on google.com
Image found on google.com



Editor: Kelsey Russo

Fall 2016

Molecular clouds are very interesting elements in space. Filled with hydrogen and helium, they create a very airy and lifted atmosphere. They typically have very low temperatures, as low as 10 to 30 kelvin. Molecular clouds can grow to be up to 600 light years across, with a mass of up to several million solar masses.



Molecular Clouds and Dark Nebula
http://www.sun.org/encyclopedia/molecular-clouds-and-dark-nebulae
Published by: Sun.org
Last edited: 1-28-2014
Describes what a molecular cloud is and how it functions in space. It explains how molecular clouds are formed and sustained and what they consist of.

Eagle NebulaCredit: T.A. Rector and B.A. Wolpa
Eagle NebulaCredit: T.A. Rector and B.A. Wolpa



Cool Cosmos
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosmic_classroom/cosmic_reference/molecular_clouds.html
Site describes what molecular clouds are made out of and their varying temperatures.

Dark molecular cloud Barnard 68
Dark molecular cloud Barnard 68


Encyclopedia Britannica
https://www.britannica.com/topic/molecular-cloud
Written by: John S. Mathis
Article describes formation of molecular clouds and their composition.

Coalsack NebulaCredit: NASA
Coalsack NebulaCredit: NASA



Cosmos
http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/cosmos/M/Molecular+Cloud
Site describes molecular cloud nuclear wavelength.

Molecules can emit radiation by changing either their rotational or vibrational states.
Molecules can emit radiation by changing either their rotational or vibrational states.



Evolution of Molecular Clouds
http://www.astro.yale.edu/larson/papers/Ringberg93.pdf
Written by: Richard B. Larson
Yale Astronomy Department
Article discusses cloud formation, characteristics, fragmentation, destruction and recycling.