Makemake
By: Jessica Sorvari

SUMMARY

Makemake is a dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt. It's name is officially 136472 Makemake, and was discovered March 31, 2005 by a team led by Michael Brown. This planet wasn't called a dwarf planet officialy until July 2008. This object was one of the Puto like objects that caused the redefinition of Planets in 2006. Makemake was named after the Rapa nui people's creator and fertility god, to preserve the planet's relationship to Easter, as it was discovered right around that time. This planet is the second brightest object in the Kuiper belt behind Pluto.

Makemake_for_site.jpg

http://www.princeton.edu/~willman/planetary_systems/Sol/Makemake


external image makemake-artist-rendering_620x350.jpg
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57553260/dwarf-planet-beyond-pluto-is-small-and-barren/


Edited by:Anthony Anaya

Fall 2012

Previous Editor: Jessica Sovari

National Geographic Daily News


URL:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/121121-planet-atmosphere-hidden-pluto/
Author: Andrew Fazekas
Reviewed By: Anthony Anaya
Last updated:
11/21/2012
Date Reviewed:
12/5/2012

Accuracy: This article was made this year. National Geographic has been accurate in its information for many years, this website can be trusted. The reputation of National Geographic has been held high for a reason.
Readability:
This web site can be understood by the basic reader. This page was not intended for children, but can be understood. The author starts out by giving a short summary of the dwarf planet, the basics are introduced. He then splits the remaining article into two main subjects. The first part talks about a rare star occultation that took place in April 2011. In the last part of his article he expands a little more on what the new discoveries mean for the distant dwarf planet.
Ease of Navigation:
The information on this page was presented on a single page in an article form. The article was centered down the page and provided hyperlinked references only to the most important information. This made for fairly easy navigation. The only problem i had with this particular page was that it wasn't longer. A more detailed explanation can be accessed at a different website called Nature, which was the recommended website by the author.


Dwarf planet Makemake an airless world of ice and rock


URL:
http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/11/dwarf-planet-makemake-an-airless-world-of-ice-and-rock/
Author:
Francis Mathew
Reviewed By: Anthony Anaya
Last updated:
11/21/2012
Date Reviewed:
12/5/2012

Accuracy:
This website seems to be accurate, the information presented on this page goes hand in hand with some of the information trusted from other websites. This author also recommended an article from the website Nature. That website in my opinion has accurate information because the author of the artcicle who wrote about Makemake was also an astronomer involved in the star occultation observation in South America.
Readability:
On the scale of readability, this page is really easy to understand. I beleive it was made for people interested in science magazines. Throughout the article there were no hyperlinked references, so the reader must have some prior knowledge of outer space. Not intended for little kids.
Ease of Navigation:
The navigation through this page was easy. There is only one page so its not difficult to get around. Not to many links relating to Makemake other than the article so if you want an informative page i would suggest website like nature.


Dwarf Planet Makemake Lacks Atmosphere

URL:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-11/e-dpm111912.php
Author:
Hook Richard
Reviewed By: Anthony Anaya
Last updated:
11/21/2012
Date Reviewed:
12/5/2012

Accuracy:
The information on this page seems to be accurate. Contact information to astronomers who were involved in the rare stellar occultation observation of Makemake are listed as contacts at the bottom of the page. This page also provides references that are hyperlinked to other websites.
Readability:
This page is easy to read, it is a short summary with key points explaining Makemake's atmosphere. Data was collected from recent stellar occultation of 2011. The article is not long so the information has been condensed. If you have no prior knowledge in astronomy this link may be a bit difficult to understand because it doesn't provide hyperlinks to vaocabulary.
Ease of Navigation:
The page was easy to navigate through. Any references were listed at the bottom and hyperlinked to other webistes.

Dwarf planet beyond Pluto is small and barren

URL:
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-205_162-57553260/dwarf-planet-beyond-pluto-is-small-and-barren/
Author:
Charles Q. Choi
Reviewed By: Anthony Anaya
Last updated:
11/21/2012
Date reviewed:
12/5/2012

Accuracy:
This a news article from a news station that has been known to be a reputable source for information.
Readability:
The text has an above average size font which makes for easy reading.
Ease of Navigation
This page was easy to navigate through, but miscellaneous pop up adds and unnecessary info made it distracting.

Rare Apparition of Dwarf Planet Makemake Reveals a Largely Airless World


URL:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=makemake-atmosphere-occultation
Author:
Matson John
Reviewed By: Anthony Anaya
Last updated:
11/21/2012
Date reviewed:
12/10/2012
Accuracy:
This article seemed to be well written and accurate.Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group which have been reputable with their information. Jose Luis Ortiz is the astronomer that led the team who observed the star occultation in 2011. Ortiz and other researchers reported their fidings in the November 22, 2012 article of Nature. This observation led by Ortiz is one of the few that have been able to provide accurate information and data. Scientific America is part of Nature, for this reason alone i believe that this site has been loyal with its data that was provided.
Readability:
The article was easy to read and provided well rounded information. Although not many resources linked to vocabulary, it still maked for easy reading. Not intended for little kids, more or less for teens and adults.
Ease of navigation:
The main issue that i had with this website were the annoying pop ups. This page was easy to navigate through with vacabulary hyperlinked and buttons to flip to the next page.

Albedo and atmospheric constraints of dwarf planet Makemake from a stellar occultation


URL:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v491/n7425/full/nature11597.html
Author:
J.L. Ortiz
Reviewed By: Anthony Anaya
Last updated: unknown
Date reviewed:
12/10/2012

Accuracy:
Nature.com is a website that can be trusted. They post multiple links to references and resources which make it easy to cross examine information. This website was one of the only that i seen recommended by National Geographic, which has been known to be very reputable with the information provided.
Readability:
This article was not designed for children, from what i've seen it is for the educated and college students who want to know the full information and data that was collected from the star occultation that occured on April 23, 2011. This article preview is packed with college level vocabulary and formula's which make it complex to understand at times.
Ease of navigation:
Although this article requires payment to read/ download i wanted to post it as a reference because it was recommended by National Geographic. The page has provided hyperlinks to the references and people that created this article. A download to the article can be accessed easily as the website provides easy instructions underneath the preview article.


The rotation Period and Light-Curve Amplitude of Kuiper Belt Dwarf Planet 136472 Makemake (2005 FY9)


URL:

http://iopscience.iop.org/1538-3881/138/2/428
Author:
A. N. Heinze and Daniel deLahunta===Last updated:===
Issue 2 (2009 August), Received 2008 December 19, accepted for publication 2009 May 17, Published 2009 June 23===Date reviewed:===
04/25/12

Reviewed by:

Jessica Sorvari

Accuracy:

The article itself is a few years old, so it may not be entirely up-to-[[#|date]], however it is being presented by the astronomical journal, a trusted astronomy recourse, so at the very least the [[#|information]] was accurate when it was published. The authors also seem to be qualified to speak on the subject, as they are astronomers in the University setting.

Readability:

The article was written for people who already have some astronomy knowledge, using vocabulary that is not used in everyday language. It is college level reading and understandable if one is already versed in the subject.

Ease of Navigation:

This particular page only contains a snippit of the article in question, with a PDF link to the full page as well as an option to just open it in html. There is a [[#|button]] to see the references the article uses, and a [[#|button]] to see people who have cited this work in their works, which could ease in research depending on how [[#|close]] the subjects of the works are. The cite is presumably set up to mimic the journal it was based on, so only things in the journal will be accessible. there is a search function where on can find a particular article, with different options to search by, such as [[#|date]] and author.

Makemake of the Outer Solar System


URL:

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080716.html

Author:

Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)

Last Updated:

07/16/2008

Date reviewed:

05/2/12

Reviewed by:

Jessica Sorvari

Accuracy:

This is merely a small summary of Makemake's attributes, but it is an accurate summary written by respected individuals.

Readability:

Anything referenced is hyperlinked to another spot in the cite where one can read on them and understand a little better what the page is talking about.

Ease of Navigation:

The entire website is pictures with explanations attached to them, all having something to do with astronomy in some way.



Windows To the Universe

URL:

http://www.windows2universe.org/our_solar_system/dwarf_planets/makemake_statistics.html

Author:

Roberta Johnson

Last Updated:

08/28/2010

Date reviewed:

05/02/12

Reviewed by:

Jessica Sorvari

Accuracy:

According to the 'about' section of the website, it was created in association with NASA, which if correct, would mean it is a very reputable source for planetary information. The information supplied is sufficient to get a general idea of the specifics of Makemake.

Readability:

The site appears to have been made for younger people, but is still readable for an older audience.

Ease of Navigation:

The site is fairly easy to navigate, the buttons are straight forward and there is a search function.

Makemake

URL:

http://jtgnew.sjrdesign.net/solsys_dwarfs_makemake.html

Author:

Stuart Robbins and David [[#|McDonald]]

Last Updated:

January 4, 2009.

Date reviewed:

05/02/12

Reviewed by:

Jessica Sorvari

Accuracy:

The information appears accurate, the references are cited on the page, so any sketchy information can [[#|be verified]].

Readability:

the reading is very straight-to-the-point, easy to read bare facts.

Ease of Navigation:

It's fairly easy to navigate through, citation is easy because at the bottom of the page it has a "How to cite this page" button, any other information needed is on the page.


National Geographic news


URL:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/07/080723-makemake.html

Author:

Anne Minard

Last Updated:

July 23, 2008

Date reviewed:

05/02/12

Reviewed by:

Jessica Sorvari

Accuracy:

An article in National Geographic is bound to be accurate to the date of release. The information focuses on naming the planet, but it does have some other facts also.

Readability:

Being the online version of National Geographic magazine, the language is more for adults, but it is readable and fairly easy to understand.

Ease of Navigation:

There are a lot of links throughout the cite, but navigation isn't particularly confusing. Flipping through the individual pages is simple with buttons at the bottom of the page.