KEPLER 62 SYSTEM
SUMMARYThe Kepler System is a group of planets that orbit a star that is less luminous than the Earth's Sun. This group of planets is about 1200 light years from Earth and is said to contain at least two planets, about the size of Earth or larger that are within the habitable zone of the star they orbit




NASA - Kepler
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/news/kepler-62-kepler-69.html

Kep62s.jpg
The diagram compares the planets of the inner solar system to Kepler-62, a five-planet system about 1,200 light-years from Earth.
Image credit: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech


Author: Brian Dunbar
Page Editor: Jessica Culler
Last Updated: April 18, 2013
Date Reviewed: May 16, 2013
Reviewed by: Yolanda Hodges – Spring 2013

Overview:
This webpage is part of NASA’s website. The page describes the recent discovery of the Kepler 62 system and its planets and star. The webpage talks about the previous missions of the Kepler spacecraft and how the Kepler telescope discovers new objects in space.

Accuracy:
The webpage appears to be updated recently enough to assume that it is well maintained and up to date. Since NASA is the operator of the Kepler missions and telescope, the information that is provide on the missions and the use of the telescope are accurate. There are links to the current mission, news and information as well as information about the spacecraft and its instruments.

Readability and Clarity:
This website is fairly easy to read and understand. The page is written in a way that eliminates technical jargon and replaces it with simple and easy words to understand. Any student, 7th grade and higher would have no problem reading and understanding this webpage.

Ease of Navigation:

This webpage is easy to navigate. Once on the page, there are topic links on the left for further information


SPACE.COM
http://www.space.com/21172-greatest-alien-planet-discoveries-nasa-kepler.html



62e.jpg
The artist's concept depicts Kepler-62e, a super-Earth planet in the habitable zone of a star smaller and cooler than the sun, located about 1,200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Lyra. Image released April 18, 2013. Credit: NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech

Author: Mike Wall, SPACE.com Senior Writer
Last Updated: 16 May 2013 Time: 07:00 AM ET
Date Reviewed: May 16, 2013
Reviewed by: Yolanda Hodges – Spring 2013

Overview:
This webpage is part of Space.Com’s website. The webpage is a brief article about the different discoveries of the Kepler spacecraft.

Accuracy:
The webpage is a very recent addition and brief, the information is most likely accurate. It appears to just be re-statements of information found on another website, most likely NASA.com. I found no discrepancy in the information provided. Instructors often warn against using sites that have advertising as they are less likely to be credible, this site has a lot of advertisements.

Readability and Clarity:
This website is fairly easy to read and understand. The short passages are free of technical terminology, but uses wording and or sentence structures that would be more fitting for high school or college age students.

Ease of Navigation:

This webpage is easy to navigate although there is very little further information on the subject.

SciTech Daily
__http://scitechdaily.com/water-planets-in-the-habitable-zone-a-closer-look-at-kepler-62e-and-62f/__


two planets.jpg
The newly discovered planets named Kepler-62e and -f are super-Earths in the habitable zone of a distant sun-like star.
The largest planet in the image, Kepler-62f, is farthest from its star and covered by ice. Kepler-62e, in the foreground,
is nearer to its star and covered by dense clouds. Closer in orbits a Neptune-size ice giant with another small planet transiting
its star. Both habitable-zone planets may be capable of supporting life. Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA)


Author: Staff
Source:Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Last Updated: April 22, 2013
Date Reviewed: May 16, 2013
Reviewed by: Yolanda Hodges – Spring 2013

Overview:
This is an article in SciTech Daily about the Kepler 62 Solar System. It appears to be more like a research paper siting other researchers, astronomers and authors. The site provides basic information about the Kepler system that could be used in a student report. The article talks about the possible characteristics of the planets and the possibility of life supporting activities on the planet.

Accuracy:
This web article is as accurate as the information provided by the researchers, authors and astronomers that were quoted or the studies that were used to produce the article. I found no discrepancy in this article from any of the previous websites. This website has a few advertisements and may be considered less credible as one without advertisements.

Readability and Clarity:
This website is fairly easy to read and understand.

Ease of Navigation:

This webpage is easy to navigate although there is very little further information on the subject with the exception of the source document.


Discovery News
http://news.discovery.com/space/alien-life-exoplanets/kepler-62-habitable-zone-two-worlds-130418.htm

Earth_Kep.jpg

Image: www.centauri-dreams.org



Author: Irene Klotz
Last Updated: Apr 18, 2013 02:00 PM ET
Date Reviewed: May 16, 2013
Reviewed by: Yolanda Hodges – Spring 2013

Overview:
This webpage is an article in Discovery News.com about the Kepler 62 system. The article has quotes from previous research, authors and astronomers. It talks about the characteristics of the planets in the Kepler 62 system and how the planets are detected.

Accuracy:
Since this is an article on the website, the article itself may not be updated, but the website would be updated with new information at it becomes available. The article shows no variation in information from the other websites and articles read on the subject, although, one quote seems to be incorrect, “….” if Jupiter hadn’t been so close, we’d again have two planets in the habitable zone and maybe we’d have a place to go,” he said.” Jupiter is actually outside of the sun’s habitable zone.

Readability and Clarity:
The webpage is clear and easy to understand. The information is provided is clear, but it lacks a consistent flow.

Ease of Navigation:

This webpage is easy to navigate. Once on the page, there are related topic links to the left, and some similar, but unrelated topic links within the reading of the article


**__Roger Launius's Blog__**
**//http://launiusr.wordpress.com/2013/05/10/exoplanets-the-kepler-62-system-compared-to-our-solar-system///**


Kep62.jpg
Image: weblogit.net


Author: Roger Launius
Last Updated: May 10, 2013
Date Reviewed: May 16, 2013
Reviewed by: Yolanda Hodges – Spring 2013

Overview:
This is a blog site by Roger Launius. The information is similar to the information found on other websites with respect to the characteristics of the planet and the sun within the Kepler system. It provides some statistical data on the size and orbits in comparison to the Earth and Sun. The site also provides information about how the Kepler telescope is used to detect other Earth-like planets.

Accuracy:
Since this is a blog, the article is probably not updated, but the site is updated with new information as it becomes available. I found no variance in information in this website compared to other sites.

Readability and Clarity:
The webpage is clear and easy to read. The audience would be geared toward high school, college age and older people who are looking for general information about the Kepler system.

Ease of Navigation:

This webpage is easy to navigate as it is just the one article. There is one link at the bottom that provides more information, but no other links relating to the subject.