Reuben H. Fleet Science Center
http://www.rhfleet.org/exhibitions/great-balls-fire?gclid=CKfJ-t-BmbcCFWQ6QgodF0wAuw

Entry_fireball_big.jpg
Entry Fireball


Overview: This webpage is the website of a center that encourages people to learn more about technology and science. They have a new exhibition that is called Great Balls of Fire, it will be available starting January 2013 to June 11th, 2013. This exhibition contains four parts to it: Origins, Asteroids, Comets, and Impact/Risks. Here at this website you can learn more about the exhibition and even buy tickets to attend this exhibition if you really want to have a more hands on experience. There are over 100 different interactive exhibits, available at the Fleet Science Center and they are available to view and learn more about on this site.
Author: Reuben H. Fleet
Last Updated: January 19, 2013
Date Reviewed: May 15, 2013
Reviewed By: Viviana Hernandez
Accuracy: This site is very reliable; the center was established in 1973. It was the first science museum setting the standards by adding a planetarium and an IMAX dome. This is a site full of available resources that are interactions open to the public. Also, on the site there is another page called the board of trustees, all the contributors, and they are all very educated mostly in the field of science.
Readability/Clarity: This site is very easy to read and also to find information. Everything is very clear on where it is located and it is directed to everyone wanting to learn more about science and technology they have a mission statement saying, "The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center seeks to inspire lifelong learning by furthering the public understanding and enjoyment of science and technology." The information scored a 39.3 on the Flesch Ease Scale which means it is harder to comprehend than the average text.
Ease of Navigation: There are more pages other than the homepage that lead to more information. They have pages to support the organization and also for information on where to visit the different exhibitions. The website seems relatively simple to navigate.

Nation Geographic
http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2013/04/23/photo-hubble-gets-first-glimpse-of-possible-comet-of-the-century/

Hubble space telescope snaps detailed view of faraway comet ISON.
Hubble space telescope snaps detailed view of faraway comet ISON.

Overview: This website is an informative entry of a recent image as shown above of a comet that recently was shot by the Hubble Telescope. The page goes about explaining more about the discovery and also how they are still watching it to find more results as this comet heads towards the sun. This webpage is a blog called Star Struck and it not only has this information on this comet but also more fascinating material relating to science. Another thing interesting is that you can share ideas and comments on this page and receive back answers from others all over also interested in topics such as the discovery of this new comet.
Author: Aundrew Fazekas
Last Updated: April 23rd, 2013
Date Reviewed: May 15, 2013
Reviewed By: Viviana Hernandez
Accuracy: The National Geographic company is a well-known organization that is up to date on all the subjects around the world. The information about the comet seems accurate; from the distance of the comet to the trajectory the comet will travel in. The author of the article also answered some questions that people left in the comment box, which helps build credibility that the author knows about the subject.
Readability/Clarity: The information provided would be useful for anyone that is interest in learning about the best possible comet for this century. The information was easily understandable and was clearly stated. This article scored a 49.9 on the Flesch Ease Scale meaning it is a more complex set of information and requires more to comprehend the information presented.
Ease of Navigation: The website itself is easy to navigate and has plenty of tabs that lead to other subjects within the whole National Geographic website. Some of the subjects are Science, Education, and Games. These are only a few of the tabs available to the visitor.

Phys
http://phys.org/news/2013-04-asteroid-threat-congress-attention.html

Illustration of an asteroid impact.
Illustration of an asteroid impact.


Overview: On this site it talks mostly about asteroids. It mainly discusses the asteroids that NASA is currently keeping a close eye on that could harm us or as they put it, "end civilization". Though this site might scare a few, it is interesting to take a look at because it goes on to talk more about asteroids and the threats they could have on us and some of the solutions they are thinking of putting into action such as funding for NASA to help them on their search for more hazardous asteroids.
Author: Richard Simon
Last Updated: April 15th, 2013
Date Reviewed: May 15, 2013
Reviewed By: Viviana Hernandez
Accuracy: The Phys website seems very reliable; it was launched in 2004. Their mission statement is, "to provide the most complete and comprehensive daily coverage of the full sweep of science, technology, and medicine news." The article gives information about how Congress has become interested in the protecting Earth from asteroids. It gives quotes from astronauts. It also gives information about a plan to send an astronaut to an asteroid by the year 2025.
Readability/Clarity: This information can be very valuable for anyone that wants to know about the future of NASA and asteroids, but anyone that is also interested in threat that asteroids pose to Earth. The article scored a 37.3 on the Flesch Ease Scale, saying that this information is harder to comprehend and can be difficult to read and understand.
Ease of Navigation: The Phys website is easy to navigate and have tabs with many sub tabs within them. Each subject within the scientific community has a range of sub tab that can lead someone to new news or other sub subjects within the same subject.


EarthSky
http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/earthskys-meteor-shower-guide

Eta Aquarid meteor.
Eta Aquarid meteor.

Overview: This site talks about meteor shows that will occur in 2013. One of the ones coming up will occur in July through August, and it will happen in the southern hemisphere if you are interested. To find more information on upcoming meteor showers, visit the link above. It includes many different links to other upcoming meteor showers. Not only does it include when these showers will occur but also more of an insight on the speed, how it might appear and where might be the best spot to catch these beauties. They also have a section of previous meteor showers and have summaries of each of these events that have taken place within this year.
Author: Bruce McClure and Deboarah Byrd
Last Updated: May, 8th 2013
Date Reviewed: May 15, 2013
Reviewed By: Viviana Hernandez
Accuracy: EarthSky began producing their science content in 1991. They are an advocate of science as a vital tool for the 21st century. The article provides valuable information about future meteor showers. It gives accurate information about the location, date, and even time of these different meteor showers. It also provides pictures of previous meteors.
Readability/Clarity: This information can helpful for anybody interested in future meteor showers and want to know when they will happen. The text received a score of 55.1 on the Flesch Scale which is close to the average reading score, so it is simple to comprehend the information presented in the text.
Ease of Navigation: The website does not have many tabs only about 9. these Tabs rang from videos to blogs to different subjects within in the website.

Universe Today
http://www.universetoday.com/100049/the-year-of-the-comets-three-reasons-why-2013-could-be-the-best-ever/

Incredible detail is seen in the gas tail of F6 Lemmon in this photo made with a 19.6-inch telescope Feb. 17, 2013.
Incredible detail is seen in the gas tail of F6 Lemmon in this photo made with a 19.6-inch telescope Feb. 17, 2013.

Overview: This website has a variety of different comets along with their pictures of each and every one. It is a page explaining how this year might just be the year for comets because of the beauties we have already witnessed. It goes more into detail talking about these comets and some materials you might want to use in order to be able to track them from your own home. Also, it has links that lead to more info on certain comets if you are looking into a certain one.
Author: Bob King
Last Updated: February, 19th 2013
Date Reviewed: May 15, 2013
Reviewed By: Viviana Hernandez
Accuracy: This website is very accurate and has astronomy enthusiasts always available if any question arises to the reader. These astronomy enthusiasts are on site all hours of the day for the people who have questions. Also, this site is run by a valuable resource who also runs another website that is very popular. The owner is named Fraser Cain, he graduated from North Island College, University of British Columbia, and G.P. Vanier. Therefore with this is in mind, it is safe to say that the information on this site is very accurate and makes this site a reliable source.
Readability/Clarity: The text is pretty simple to understand and comprehend; this can be supported by the Flesch Reading Score of 53.
Ease of Navigation: The navigation of this site is very simple, on the top it has tabs of information that leads you to what you are in search of. Though it does contain a lot of material, it is still easily to get around to everything without a problem.

National Space Society
http://www.nss.org/settlement/asteroids/
Overview: This website has a lot of useful Information. Video Library,Space news,Space Tourism, Space Transportation. This website also has a very interesting article on mining Asteroids.The Iron and Nickel in Amun have a market value of about $8,000 billion, the cobalt content adds another $6,000 billion, and the platinum-group metals add another $6,000billion. Whom ever gets to mine these Asteroids will be rich or could get our country out of debt.It would also take away the threat of one of these huge rocks
hitting earth and destroying us.
Author: John S. Lewis
Last Updated: April 26, 2012
Date Reviewed: December 5, 2012
Reviewed By: Londa Cutshaw


http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/profile.cfm?Object=Asteroids&Display=OverviewLong
Overview: This is a good site for getting information on Asteroids, Comets and the planets. This site tells you how Asteroids are formed, and how they come up with the names for them. It gives you significant dates as to win the Asteroids were discovered, and by who. This site is easy to get around on and gives a lot of useful information.
Author: Samantha Harvey and Autumn Burdick
Last Updated: May 22, 2012
Date Reviewed: December 5, 2012
Reviewed By: Londa Cutshaw
Audience: Everyone

EarthSky
http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/earthskys-meteor-shower-guide
Overview: Late night December 13 til early morning December 14 Geminis the final major meteor shower of every year. It often produces 50 meteors per hour. The new moon guarantees a dark sky for the show, the best time to view the Meteor shower would be from 1 a.m. to 3 a.m. on December 14th 2012. Don't miss the show!
Author: Bruce McClure and Deborah Byrd
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Reviewed: December 4, 2012
Reviewed By: Londa Cutshaw
Audience: Everyone

meteor_Taurid_11-9-2012_Dale_Forrest_Boone_NC-e1352603458659.jpg



new-comet-2012-s1-ison-found_59612_600x450.jpg
National Graphic News
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/09/120927-new-comet-2012-s1-ison-science-space-moon/
Overview: NEW COMET DISCOVERED- MAY BECOME "ONE OF THE BRIGHTEST in HISTORY." Right now the comet is a faint glow in the sky. The comet might become visible to the naked eye for a few months in late 2013 and early 2014. Astronomers say it might outshine the moon, So keep a look out in the sky for this amazing sight. To find out more on this Comet you can click on the link above, and it will take you to the National Geographic website on this amazing article.
Author: Andrew Fazekas
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Reviewed: December 3, 2012
Reviewed By: Londa Cutshaw
Audience: Everyone


Astronomy Workshop
planet.http://janus.astro.umd.edu/
Overview: If your interested in learning more about Solar System Collisions. There is a fun site called Astronomy Workshop it is easy to find and to get around on the site. you scroll down to Solar System Collision and you can pick your favorite planet to get hit and it gives you the information as to what damage and impact it has on the planet.

Author: Dr. Douglas P. Hamilton
Last Updated: November 28, 2012
Reviewed By: Londa Cutshaw
Audience: Everyone

Astronomy for Kids
http://www.kidsastronomy.com/comets.htm


external image asteroids3_neargal.jpg
All three of these ateroids shown above are same to scale are Mathilde Gaspra and Ida.
"Imaged by NASA spacecraft, the three potato-shaped objects above are large main-belt asteroids orbiting between Mars and Jupiter."

external image hst_sl9_9426c.jpg


Comet Shoemaker-Levy9 shown above is one of many comets although this specific one no longer exists but forevermore holds a place in Space History. The following link below will direct you to a photogallery of many other comets from which this image has been provided. (For more information on this specific comet click on the comet's highlighted name to be directed to nineplanets.org.)
<http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/photo_gallery/photogallery-comets.html>

orionid-meteor-shower-2011-emfinger-nebula.jpg

The streak in the sky shown above is a meteor an image provided by Space.coma source of news for astronomy, skywatching, space exploration, as well as commercial spaceflight and other related technologies. "The dazzling "shooting star" display was sparked by the 2011 Orionid meteor shower, which peaked before sunrise on Saturday (Oct. 22)."

Seiichi Yoshida's Home
http://www.aerith.net/index.html
Overview:On the website you can find a list of upcoming comets. It also provides information on the comets that are coming, like brightness and where it has been seen before. This site seems to updated regularly with its last update being November 22, 2011. The site is very easy to navigate with links to other resources and references. It is even bilingual Japanese being the second language. The site also provides pictures of comets and the observation diary of the author Seiichi Yoshida. I found the information on this site to very clear and easy to read, it is very helpful.
Author: Seiichi Yoshida
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Viewed: November 22, 2011
Viewed By: Marisol Gomez
Audience: Everyone

NASA Home
http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html
Overview: On this page you can find pretty much anything you want about space. The web site is very easy to navigate and is easy to read. It has links for students, teachers, public, media, and others. It has pictures from all the latest missions and from other space related events. The site offers a tool bar at the top of the page that upcoming NASA events. The web site is very up to date with its last update being November 29, 2010. I would recomend looking and using this site if you ever have to do any reasearch on an astronomy topic.
Author: Jim Wilson
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Viewed: November 22, 2011
Reviewed By: Marisol Gomez
Audience: Everyone

Space
http://www.space.com/about_us/
Overview:
If you are looking for a web site that has a lot of links to other articles and stories about space I would look at the site (. Space.com has a ton of up to date information about what is going on in the sky. The web site was launched in 1999 and has information on "news of astronomy, sky watching, space exploration, commercial spaceflight and related technologies". One of the things I likes most about this site was the picture that it provided for Comets, Meteors, and Asteroids. The site was extremely easy to navigate and it was an easy read.
Author: Robert Roy Britt
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Viewed: December 1, 2010
Reviewed By: Taylor Lopez
Audience: High School, College, and Adults


Views of the Solar System
http://www.solarviews.com/eng/asteroid.htm
Overview: On the website I found a good description of what asteroids are. It was nice how it also gave some background information on the information known about asteroids. Included on the introduction page is an asteroid summary chart. Though the page is not all fancy with a ton of pictures I found that it was easy enough to read and understand. Navigating the page was easy enough with the use of the table of contents located on the top of the page. I was however not able to find a date on when it was last updated. It is worth a read if you are looking for information on asteroids.
Author: Calvin J. Hamilton
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Viewed: December 1, 2010
Reviewed By: Taylor Lopez
Audience: Students

National Geographic
http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/solar-system/asteroids-comets-article.html
Overview: On the National Geographic web site all the information is easy to find because they have a user friendly layout. It has in interactive part of the page where you can learn more about asteroids and comets. The page is very up to date with new stories every week. I found that it was easy to read because it kept me entertained, it was also very easy to go from one page to the next. I would recommend this page for anyone that wanted to read some interesting stories about space. Also anyone that is doing a project or research would find this web site very helpful.
Author: Unknown
Last Updated: Unknown
Date Viewed: December 1, 2010
Reviewed By: Taylor Lopez
Audience: Adults




Page Edited- By, Georgina Khodayari
Date Read- 12/2/08
Audience- Kids, High school
Author- EnchantedLearning.com

Another website I found was on http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/comet/ which was a site all about comets. This website is pretty simple to read and understand for anyone. It is a detailed site that explains informative and basic information about comets. This includes what a comet is, all the parts of a comet, a comet's orbit, a comet's exploration, and cosmic snowballs. The site also provides fun little quizzes and activites about comets, and has some colorful helpful pictures to go along with the explanation of a comet. I would recommend this site if you only want to know basic and quick information about comets.

Page Edited- By, Georgina Khodayari
Date Read- 12/3/08
Audience- High school, College
Author- Bill Arnett

A fourth website I found was http://www.nineplanets.org/asteroids.html , which was a good site that provided a lot of useful information on asteroids. The first explains how asteroids were first discovered, and how they were thought to be comets. It also informs you on how many asteroids are found each year, and how the total mass of all asteroids is less than half the mass of Earth's moon. The text is fairly reasonable to read, I would recommend it for any High school or college students. Anyone in those categories can easily understand the site, there is no need for prior knowledge about space rocks or astronomy, in order to recognize the given information. The website also presents its viewers with some realistic photographs of asteroids and it explains the different types of asteroids that have been found, such as the C-type, S-type, and the M-type. The site even provides its own list of compared comets and asteroids, other links about asteroids, and its own critical thinking questions about asteroids.

Page Edited- By, Georgina Khodayari
Date Read- 12/5/08
Audience- High school, College, and Adults
Author- Rosanna L. Hamilton

The last website I reviewed with great information on Meteors, was http://www.solarviews.com/eng/meteor.htm , which told you and showed you many different facts and pictures of meteors and meteorites. This website gives you the best photographs of every different type of meteor that has ever been discovered. I would recommend this site to only students in High school, College, and/or any adults; due to the fact that the website is written very text book advanced writing. The site even tells you meteorite types and the percentage that falls to our Earth. This site is useful for people who want to learn of every type of meteor there is and what it looks like, for example some of the ones presented are: Martian, Chondrite, Achondrite, Iron, and etc.




Page edited by Bryant Mitchell
Date read:10/22/07
Audience:highschool to adults
Author: Astronomy Department at Cornell University

The first website I reviewed was http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/comets.php and here is what I thought about it.
The opening web page gives lots of information about Comets, Asteroids and Meteors but there isn't a great deal pf pictures on the opening page.But if you click on the links that are provided the pictures are quite vivd. Along with the good pictures there also is an explination of what the picture is in pretty good detail. The web site also has Frequently asked questions at the bottom of the page. There are either begginer questions for people just starting out, intermediate questions for those who know alittle about astrolomy, and advance question for those future astonomers. The website also lets you ask a questions if the question they have listed aren't the ones you need.All in all the website is a very good one for research, and if you would like to have some great pictures for a research paper or just for show.

Date Read:11/9/07
Author:Professor M.A. Barstow
Audience:Highschool Students

The second website I visited was http://library.thinkquest.org/J001665/cam.html What I thought about this site was that at first glance it is kind of boring! The opening page is just a bold heading and nothing else. There is only one picture of each item. One for a asteroid,meteor, and The writing is elemetary,and the site is just not a good one. There should be more pictures and alot more information. Compared to other sites this one just doesn't stack up. There isn't nearly enough information on the page for an essay or report. If you chose to use this site it would only be to use as a definition for meteor, asteriod and comets, but nothing else. There aren't even links on the page that take you to other places that have more information. This page is elementary with no imagination,and information. The only one thing the website would be good for was like I wrote earlier, a definition.




Page Edited by: Sean Tanner
Date Read: 04/21/08
Author: Planetary Society Shared Groupings
Susan Lendroth
Audience: High School to Adults

One of the websites in which I visited was http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/asteroids_and_comets/facts.html This website starts of by listing a large amount of facts that are directly related to asteroids and comets. This is useful information because a lot of normal people would not know them. The author goes on to describe in depth the spectral classifications and orbital classifications of asteroids. This website was easy to read and understand because it had many sub-sections to each category and went more in depth. On the left side-pane there are other space topics that would be extremely useful to people interested in astronomy. This website belongs to an organization that prides themselves on being involved in politics, education, space exploration. They have also directly contributed to the exploration on Mars. Within the website pertaining to asteroids and comets, they have links to other articles, which makes it an abundance of information and great sources.


Page Edited by: Sean Tanner
Date Read: 4/27/08
Author: Dr. Sten Odenwald
NASA Astronomer
Audience: Mainly Adults

Another website I read was http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/ametcom.html . When I first entered the website I was astounded to see that the font was not very professional and the layout seemed to be somewhat of a nuisance. I dug a little deeper. I started clicking various links associated with different questions. This web site is full of excellent information that would be great for the amateur astronomer. However, finding that information could have been made a lot easier. If the website developer would have divided into sub-sections, it would have been an ideal tactic.The age group it is meant for is Adults because the developer uses a lot of big words and large concepts with not a lot of explaining. When I was researching the website and playing around there were a lot of missing links and unfinished pages, which left me a little disappointed. The Asteroids, Meteors, and Comets page, the one I put all my attention towards, was just a sub-section of the main web site. Most of the information on the website seems pretty up to date. It does not have a section saying how many times it has been updated, but it was first made in 1995.


Page Edited by: Sean Tanner
Date Read: 5/11/08
Author: Nancy Yu
Audience: All Ages

The Third website in which I visited was http://www.squidoo.com/Asteroids_Comets_Meteors. This website is full of external links on how to build models of the solar system, where to buy stuff for it, detailed pictures and a lot of information. Squidoo is a user based network of people that create website, they have a chief editor and a very organized system. Each section is clearly labeled and easy to distinguish. All of the websites that I visited prior had about the same information pertaining to asteroids, meteors, and comets. It seems to me to be accurate. This website was a very easy read if you have an advanced vocabulary. I think most kids and young adults would have a pretty firm grasp of the information as well. The sections in the page have an overall main heading then smaller font for different topics. There was an abundance of pictures, it's always entertaining to look at pictures when studying about topics. The website did not show a date in which it was created, but it looks very modern and judging from the pictures and the ammount of information I can assume it is fairly recent.


Page Edited by: Sean Tanner
Date Read: 5/12/08
Author: Bhavini Raja
Audience: Young adults - Older Adults


The fourth website that I visited was http://www.nmm.ac.uk/server/show/conWebDoc.15573.
NMM / Learning / Fact files & in-depth / Astronomy & space / Comets, meteors and asteroids.
I learned a lot of information from this site that it did not explain in the previous sites. The part of the page that I thought was very useful was "Shower meteors appear to originate from a specific point in the sky or 'radiant', with the shower taking the name of the constellation where this is found - so Perseus hosts the Perseids radiant ". There are pictures on the website courtesy of NASA that help correlate the information and gather data. It's interesting to learn about the history of many of these concepts. The information is very accurate because most of it is taken from NASA, which the author gives credit for. This website made studying the information very easy because of all the pictures and graphical information associated with the main concept. There is a graph showing how and why meteors are detected at specific times of the day related to the earth's orbital motion.

Page Edited by: Sean Tanner
Date Read: 5/12/08
Author: James L. Hilton
Audience: Adults

The last website I visited was http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications. This website explains the different classifications of different asteroids. This website would be the perfect tool for an astrogeologist. At the top of the page it has a picture taken by the Hubble Space telescope. The website goes over the different masses and densities of different asteroids. There is also a link to another part of his website http://www.usno.navy.mil/USNO/astronomical-applications that tells when the first asteroid was discovered and why they are classified differently from planets. This is one of the best websites I have visited in my research for several reasons. It was aimed particularly at adults and used a lot of technical classifications and several different charts. Reading and understanding the information was very easy. Not only has it been updated to date, but it has also made predictions for the future. The history of the research was very important also, the author kept that in mind when making the page. Navigation was simple and precise. The coolest part about this website was that it had a long list of references so not only does it provide accurate reasoning for his writing, but it also allows the viewer to do some more research by themselves and research main figures in astronomy.

Editing Done By: Tim Ferguson

http://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Question62695.htmlThis website is a quick overview between the differences of Comets, Asteroids, and Meteors. Easy to read for anybody who is interested.

http://www.go-astronomy.com/solar-system.htm
Full details of comets, asteroids, and meteors on this website. Click on the link in which you interested in and learn about all of the facts there. The best website for students learning about such aspects in astronomy.
http://www.kidsastronomy.com/comets.htm