Spring 2014 Brenton Wirth

birth of stars.jpg
http://www.petroglyphgallery.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=427


Note: All information, links and videos were reviewed by Brenton Wirth

Stars are some of the most prominent objects we observe in our night sky, shining proudly against the cosmic black. They do so many things for our universe by providing heat and light. When they die their precious guts made of iron, oxygen, and even gold are spewed into the universe. And as we perceive time linearly, it's natural to wonder how do stars come into being. This wiki page will instruct you of the birth and infancy of these galactic factories we call stars.

URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EnBBIx6XkM
Author: Stephen Hawking
fafa34ff-5c7c-44f5-9422-e989f1967d1c.jpg
This YouTube video from The Discovery Channel’s “Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking provides a very basic conceptual way of explaining the birth of stars. He manages to boil down a lot of information about newborn stars and how they form in four minutes and thirty seconds in which he discusses in a concise and accurate way what role hydrogen plays in the formation of stars.
Date: April, 9, 2010

URL: http://www.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/star_birth.htm
Author: N/A
star_birth.gif
This site also gives a solid and basic explanation of the birth of stars with it’s simple layout and humble illustrations. What makes this site stand out is its slight focus on the chemistry aspect of different classes of newborn stars. It also discusses a little bit about the OBAFGKM spectral classes.

URL: http://csep10.phys.utk.edu/astr162/lect/birth/proto.html
Author: N/A
pia12108-750.jpg
This site provides spectacular images of nebula's and protostars. It's definitely one of the more technical sites, being sure to give the exact scientific designated name to all of the objects it shows, and gives a very detailed H-R diagram of a Young open cluster of stars that was quite integral to my understanding of the type of diagram. The site has a minimalist design, comprised of only text and pictures.
Date: N/A

URL: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/stars/lifecycle/starbirth.shtml
Author: Enhanced Learning: All About Astronomy
Starbirth1.gif
I really enjoy this website. It provides some of the most detailed info-graphics of any of the websites. It’s easy to navigate, clean and simple. The pictures that they employ to illustrate the formation of stars give the viewer a great visual component to learning about this topic.
Date: Copyright 1999

URL: http://jwst.nasa.gov/birth.html
Author N/A
birth_of_stars.jpg
Webb Science: The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems gives a well rounded historical context to the science of studying stars with a couple good space analogies thrown in and it discusses briefly the role stars play in form planets. The site looks very well polished at is beautiful and informative.
Date: N/A


URL: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/cosmology-and-astronomy/stellar-life-topic/stellar-life-death-tutorial/v/birth-of-stars
Author: “Khan Academy” Salman Khan
Khan_Academy_Logo.svg.png
Overview
Most of us know that Khan Academy provides very detailed and calculated videos about various subjects and astronomy is no exception. Khan delivers a comprehensive look at how star form step by step, showing how hydrogen fuses into helium, what the ignition process is and how the atoms behave in order to perform this.
Date: November 23, 2010






baby.jpg
dreamstime.com

Spring 2012 Alexis Moreno



Since the dawn of time, people have raised their heads at night and looked at the wonderful glow of stars and were filled with wonder and questions. How'd do they come to be? Are there "baby" stars? There is so much to learn about stars with not enough time to check every link online to find the best ones. Here you can find pictures and reviews of links about star formation. Reviews contain the clarity of the wording, credibility, and audience. If you're curious about formation of stars, check out the following links and be enlightened.






Note: All of the following links have been reviewed by Alexis Moreno.



eNotes

URL: [[http://www.enotes.com/science/q-and-a/how-stars-born-how-do-they-die-289530]]
Author: "Fact Finder", Abell, George O., Engelbert, Phillis.
Last Update: October 10th 2011
Date Reviewed: May 9th, 2012
Reviewed by: Alexis Moreno
The answer used to explain star birth is consistent with other readings, but in simpler terms. This summary is quite useful in gaining general understanding of star birth in understandable terms. I would not suggest when looking for anything more than a general idea. It is written concisely and understandably, yet there are no links to continue searching for more information. It is not very creditable or would not suggest using it in a paper or anything that needs cites. This site should be used for personal understanding and clarity, but probably no more than that. Also, seems to be clear enough for middle school children and higher.

http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=14309
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=14309

Case Western Reserve University: Chris Mihos

1. URL:[[http://burro.astr.cwru.edu/stu/stars_birth.html]]

Author: Chris Mihos
Last Update: January 11th, 2006
Date Reviewed: May 13th, 2012
One of the benefits of this site is that it is more trustworthy, because it is linked to a university, and appears to be a teacher's page. It discusses different nebulae as well as the actual formation. It's clear on information with logical wording. The webpage is somewhat minimalist feel but the information is worth it. Audience seems to be high schoolers and up. You can find out more at the top of the page which has tabs with different astrological topics including "Life and Death of Stars." It was last updated in 2006 but the information seems the same as 2012 information. Also I feel that if you need up to date information, this is not the website to use, like said in here already it is about the same information in a 6 year period which is not helpful in most cases.

http://spacetelescope.org/static/archives/images/screen/heic1118a.jpg
http://spacetelescope.org/static/archives/images/screen/heic1118a.jpg



2. URL: [[http://burro.cwru.edu/stu/advanced/stars_birth.html]]
Author: Chris Mihos

Last Update: January 11th, 2006
Date Reviewed: May 9th, 2012

This website is off the same main page as the link above but more mathematical and advanced. It appears to be accurate and detailed. It also includes many formulas involved in star birth such as "Jean's Mass." The reading is easy to understand but it can be confusing. If you're interested in more about mass and how it is involved with star birth, this is the site to view. Audience seems to be directed at college students or people of higher learning.



NASA

URL: [[http://nasascience.nasa.gov/astrophysics/focus-areas/how-do-stars-form-and-evolve/]]
Author: Unknown but NASA official is Ruth Netting.
Last Updated: March 21st, 2012
Date Reviewed: May 9th, 2012

This site is great. Not only is it trustworthy and accurate, it is understandable all throughout. There are also pictures to go along with the many topics discussed. There are many parts of the formation of stars it goes into. It is also updated very recently, especially compared to other sites. Although the authors name does not appear, I still find it to be extremely creditable. Audience seems to be the general public, children not included.
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=14309
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=14309



Universe Today

URL: [[http://www.universetoday.com/24190/how-does-a-star-form/]]
Author: Fraser Cain
Last Updated: January 26th, 2009
Date Reviewed: May 9th, 2012

Cain can go into things most people wouldn't understand but brings it back to lay-man terms and is overall understandable. The website is accurate and professional, it is a really good site to read up on the creation of stars. It also includes background information on the author. If you do not feel like reading the whole NASA page suggested above, this is a good alternative since Cain cites the same link above for his work. Audience seems to be adults.










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Birth of Stars:
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Fall 2012 - Jessica Lanzas


Royal Astronomical Society

URL: http://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/219-news-2012/2123-how-nature-shapes-the-birth-of-starsexternal image r136_hst_small.jpg
Author: Unknown
Last Updated: Friday, 11 May 2012 09:38
Date Reviewed: 12/05/12

This site is very informative. It lets you know what stars are made of. Which in case you didn't know are made from dark clouds of gas and dust. I enjoy this website because they talk about the formation of stars, and they talk about things that happened. They mention a few things about star clusters (which is an example of the image on the right). This website is accurate and full of helpful information. It's short and simple, and easy to read and understand. It's a easy to follow website and it helps with navigation. It helps you get what you need to know about how nature shapes the birth of stars.





Stars

URL:http://library.thinkquest.org/27131/stars.html
Author: Unknown
Last Updated: Not Stated
Date Reviewed: 12/05/12

In all honesty, I did not like this website. For one, there's way to much going on. The colors, the background. Everything is just very distracting to the eye. Yeah sure, it gives us some information about the birth of stars but its only 3 sentences. When I went to the link that said "About this site", It gives a few information about the website and mentions that its for ages 19 and under. Why is this website limited to age requirement? There are no photos giving example of the birth stars and gives other information about other stuff. Which is good but not much help on if you want to know more about the birth of stars. Not recommended.

Royal Museums Greenwich

URL:http://www.rmg.co.uk/explore/astronomy-and-time/astronomy-facts/stars/stellar-evolution/the-birth-of-stars
Messier 100, A spiral galaxy
Messier 100, A spiral galaxy

Author: Unknown
Last Updated: Not Stated
Date Reviewed: 12/06/12

I like this website because it's easy to read and there are easy access to other links. It doesn't only talk about the stars, but it also talks about the moon, the universe, storm watch, solar system (etc.) The links are placed on the left with easy to view letters where you can see where you want to go. It also talks about the galaxies and why the stars glow. The reason for it of course would be because of the age of the stars. The author mentions that the brighter stars are the older the stars are, and the stars that are younger are the ones placed by the spiral arms of the galaxy that appear bluish. This website is informative and very helpful.


NASA- The Birth of Stars

URL: http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1513.html
Author:Yvette Smith
Spiral galaxy M83
Spiral galaxy M83

Last Updated:11/10/09
Date Reviewed: 12/06/12

Now I came across this website, and noticed that the student above used NASA as well. However I opened her link and she didn't have the exact same thing. I enjoyed the picture because of the colors and because of how big the photo was. However, we're not here for the photos but of the information provided. The information provided on this website is focused more, on the photo. Which in my opinion is great. But as far as information goes, I don't think it's as great as information as you can get on other pages that go into detail. But, I think this website is helpful. The navigation isn't to open but it's not confusing. They do mention some information about the birth of stars and how the death of some stars can actually be seen in the image provided.




Curious About Astronomy? StarURL:http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/stars.php

Author: Unknown
Last Updated: 12/16/12
Date Reviewed: 12/06/12

This website is quite simple, easy to read, easy to follow. A little information about everything. How stars are born, how they die, the balance, the clusters. In other words, I would say that it's helpful due to the fact that it gives you a little bit of everything. But of course if you want to go more into depth of this website you won't be able to gather much information on just the Birth of Stars. The navigation is simple and straight forward not difficult to read at all.



Brady Sheehan Fall 2016

Birth of Stars- Zoom Astronomy
URL: http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/astronomy/stars/lifecycle/starbirth.shtml
Image result for birth of stars
Image result for birth of stars
Image result for birth of stars
Image result for birth of stars


Author: Enchanted Learning
Last Updated: 12/7/16
Date Reviewed: 12/7/16

This website is very clear when it comes to directing you where you want or need to go. It clearly states what section is what and even has a table of contents. It has multiple tabs not just including the home page. It also has some great photos that lists step by step of the birth of the star on the website which I have attached above. I feel the audience is directed towards many different people due to the simplicity of the website and how easy it is to use.This website is up to date and reliable because at the bottom it says its been around since 1999 and updated in 2016.


How is a Star Born?

URL: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-is-a-star-born/
orion nebula
orion nebula

Many stars are born in the beautiful Orion Nebula

Author: Richard Brill and Margaret M. Hanson
Last Updated: N/A
Date Reviewed: 12/7/16

This website is very useful and it helped me a lot. It makes a lot of since when talking about the Birth of Stars. Its not a whole lot of information, but the information that is on this website is useful and very knowledgeable. There are two people in this article that talk about The Birth of Stars so it is pretty credible. There is something Richard Brill says that I really like, he said "when the core reaches a temperature of about 2000 degree Kelvin, the molecule of hydrogen gas breaks apart into hydrogen atoms. Eventually the core reaches a temperature of 10,000 degrees Kelvin, and it begins to look like a star when fusion reaction begins. When it has all collapsed to about 30 times the size of our sun, it becomes a protostar." I think this explains how a star is born pretty well which makes this a good website to go to. I think it is directed to more of a college level audience, but other than that it is very easy to use.


Stars And Galaxies

URL: http://www.esa.int/esaKIDSen/SEMY06WJD1E_OurUniverse_0.html

Nearby galaxy NGC 1569
Nearby galaxy NGC 1569


Author: N/A
Last Updated:12/7/16
Date Reviewed: 12/7/16

This website is very easy to understand and perfect for younger people to get information from. It doesn't have a whole lot of information, but it has just the right amount to get the basic idea down of how stars are born and how they die. The audience I would say is not for kids, but more like teenagers. There are many reliable resources and there isn't just one page, there are multiple tabs you can choose from that are very helpful. I like how if you click on a picture it takes you to a detailed description of it. Just like the picture I have attached above, dwarf galaxy NGC 1569, is described as "a hotbed of vigorous stars that blow huge bubbles and super bubbles that riddle the main body of the galaxy."

Birth of Stars & Protoplanetary Systems
URL: http://jwst.nasa.gov/birth.html
Pillars of Creation in IR
Pillars of Creation in IR


Author: NASA
Last Updated: NA
Date Reviewed: 12/7/16

For this website, I think it is very reliable since it is a website that has to do with NASA. Although students above who have also used NASA does not have the same information as I do. My information is more up to date since people on here were writing this back in 2012 and we are now in 2016. It also has many tab options on the left hand side with things about stars you might want to do. For this tab for the birth of stars I feel like there are more pictures and videos than written information which can be a bad thing because not every viewer of the website will pay much attention to the pictures and the videos. Its perfect for the younger crowd since there is a lot of these pictures and videos, which throws me off because looking at the website initially, it looks like it would be meant as a website for older people. However, I do believe it is very helpful how they have links at the top that say key concepts, in depth, and related content to direct you down the page and show you what area is what as well as give you additional information to look at if you don't find what your're looking for here.

Star Birth

URL: http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/page/star_birth
external image sig07-005c.jpg?1374182511

Author: Cool Cosmos
Last Updated: 8/3/13
Date Reviewed: 12/7/16

This website looks very well put together. It has got quite a few interesting photos and a lot of information that seems useful. There are tabs of different areas of studies when it comes to stars on the left hand side that are very clear and precise as to what they are for. It is also a really cool thing that just like one of the websites I chose above, is that if you click on the photos on the page it brings you to a detailed page about the picture, and what it is, and even where the picture was originally from. They even have some fun fact boxes on the right hand side as you scroll down and read the page. I think the audience for this website would be middle school kids because it is very simple to use for high school and above, but a little too detailed for younger kids.